Andrew spots a contra-indication…

Over the weekend, I found it uncomfortable when going to the toilet. Then I noticed some redness in the bowl of the toilet. The first time it happened, I woke Andrew up from his Sunday afternoon nap, and he was going to ring the out-of-hours GP. However, as I had just eaten a whole bag of Haribo Strawberries, we thought that we would wait and see if it happened again. Later, yesterday evening, it did. So I knew that this morning I would be on the telephone to our GP’s practice to see what could be done. Being me, I … Continue reading Andrew spots a contra-indication…

Withington Community Hospital to the rescue

Okay, so the rescue was nearly a fortnight ago, but it is still imprinted on my memory, and I haven’t quite got round to blogging about it. Andrew and I were off to Cornwall via a flight to Manchester (my cousin Marianne was driving down so that’s why we were in Manchester) and we got there all safely, with everything we needed — except my meds. For the first time that we have been away together, we forgot them. They were set out ready to come, but were left behind. Fortunately, I had one of my Eviplera in a pill … Continue reading Withington Community Hospital to the rescue

Guest blog: HIV Contraction Risk Higher in Female Drug Users

Gay males are often cruelly stigmatised in the media’s portrayal of HIV, and it is a common misconception that the disease is more likely to be transmitted between men. In reality, both men and women are at risk of contracting the disease and injective drugs continue to pose a risk to those that use them. Arguably, the media tends to associate HIV more with men, but the truth is that globally the number of women suffering from HIV equalled that of men more than a decade ago. In the UK, that figure is slightly less; three in ten HIV sufferers are female. … Continue reading Guest blog: HIV Contraction Risk Higher in Female Drug Users

How involved are you in your HIV care? (via Baseline magazine)

How involved are you in your HIV care? What is the impact of treatment on your day-to-day life? BASELINE have an online survey, please complete it here. http://baseline-hivcare.kantarhealth.com/wix1/p1572343412.aspx Continue reading How involved are you in your HIV care? (via Baseline magazine)

Do we get to get your autograph now…?

It has been a goal for many months, indeed it has been a goal since I was diagnosed back in March 2009. Suffice to say the goal posts have moved now… but what happened in the Royal yesterday? Up at the HIV Clinic in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast it was great to see new faces,  a few old ones and ones that have been there most days that I have been up. New social worker With Corinne having retired in June, there was a new social worker who has been in post for some months, he was very pleased … Continue reading Do we get to get your autograph now…?

Back and looking forward to WAD2012

It’s been a while… I’ve been bad and not blogged on here for a while. I’ve not been neglecting this blog specifically, but other blogs that I have have been quiet too. Something happened recently that made me go quiet on them. But I know that people use this to keep up with how I am doing… so back I come… Of course, it is also coming up to World Aids Day 2012 – we’re just over a month away. It’s on 1 December if you don’t know… So it is time to think about what can be done to … Continue reading Back and looking forward to WAD2012

A quiet act in Indonesia will help many

The President of Indonesia, Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has quietly acted to help tackle his countries HIV crisis. What has he done? The President quietly issued an order to start producing drugs patented by global pharmaceutical companies like GlaxoSmithKline and Gilead in his own country. Indonesia has set an important precedent, not just for the people living with HIV within its country, who have been campaigning for this, but also for other developing countries. This is one of the widest licences issued by a government and rightly reflects the reality that a range of treatment options is needed. — Michelle Childs of Médecins Sans … Continue reading A quiet act in Indonesia will help many

Science shows that the war on drugs does not work

A video for anyone who wants to better understand the failures of prohibition and learn more about alternatives that have proven to be more cost-effective, safe, and humane. Brought to you by the International Centre for Science in Drug Policy — where science, not ideology, drives illicit drug policy. SIGN THE VIENNA DECLARATION: http://www.viennadeclaration.com Continue reading Science shows that the war on drugs does not work

Support: given and received. Volunteering rewards us all.

After waking up with a sore head this morning, I have had quite a busy day. Two appointments which were linked to HIV and one that was to do with church and proofreading. News from the clinic There is not much news from the HIV Clinic this morning. I’ve come away with two months’ worth of Eviplera and a bottle of Gaviscon (to assist with the heartburn) and the vampires were back in force. Having not had any blood tests taken last month as I was changing my meds we have had the usual ones done today. So my left … Continue reading Support: given and received. Volunteering rewards us all.